Which MTG Sets Have Slivers? (Should You Make a Deck With Them?)

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Which MTG Sets Have Slivers?

When most people set out to build a Magic: the Gathering deck, they want it to be as powerful as possible, even if they’re not competing.

If you’re looking to do the same thing, the Sliver tribe isn’t an unwise decision. They’re completely viable (and strong!) in casual play.

But if you don’t have any yet, which MTG sets have slivers?

We’ll give you the scoop. Here’s what we’ll cover:

  • What are slivers?
  • Which MTG sets have them?
  • Our recommendation on whether or not you should use them

Let’s dive in.

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What are Slivers?

Slivers are a kind of creature in Magic: the Gathering that function as a hive mind.

Because they’re all interconnected, abilities each sliver has are shared across all other slivers you control on the battlefield. The result of this can be absolutely deadly and complex.

They’re a strong tribe to build, although more powerful slivers often are more expensive and highly sought after.

MTG Sets with Slivers

Since they’ve proven successful, slivers can actually be found in the packs of quite a few sets.

You could potentially pull them in the following sets:

  • Future Sight
  • Legions
  • Magic 2014 Core Set
  • Magic 2015 Core Set
  • Modern Horizons
  • Planar Chaos
  • Scourge
  • Stronghold
  • Tempest
  • Time Spiral

The theme of the 2007 Future Sight set was, predictably, the future. As such, there were numerous “futureshifted” cards, which were cards that hinted at what was to be printed in coming sets.

Interestingly, many of these cards referenced abilities and types of cards that didn’t exist at the time.

Note that Future Sight is an old set, and booster boxes are not very common. As a result, the links we provided above are to a booster pack rather than a set.

The second of the creature-only Magic: the Gathering expansions, you can anticipate your pulls from this set to be filled with all kinds of creatures. This one featured a ton of popular creatures, such as dragons, elves, zombies, and of course, slivers.

An especially large set, Magic 2014’s Core Set re-introduced slivers to the game. It also had a heavy focus on the planeswalker Chandra, so this is a good set for you if she’s one of your favorite characters.

Like Magic 2014 (M14), the Magic 2015 Core Set was also particularly large, with 269 potential cards. Several slivers emerged in this set, as well, making it an option for those looking to expand their sliver arsenal.

This set was a moderate size, with booster packs that came in unusual 17-card bundles rather than the usual 15. Slivers are an integral tribe in Modern Horizons, so you’ll find quite a few of them in this set.

Furthermore, snow-covered lands make a return in Modern Horizons, so it’s a great set for full-art land collectors. (For more information on full-art lands, you can check out our list on sets with them here.

A little like the futureshifted cards in Future Sight, Planar Chaos had its own “timeshifted” cards that it was known for. These were supposed to be cards reprinted from other realities, so they looked like previous cards but were different in some way, such as their color or creature type.

You’ll also find a handful of interesting slivers in this set.

If dragons are your kind of thing, then you’ll love Scourge. This set was advertised as “the dragon set” for a reason, and comes with a large number of dragon-themed cards.

Like all others on this list, it also has a bunch of slivers to potentially pull.

This set introduced the Sliver Queen, an incredibly strong sliver card that’s often used as the Commander in the Commander format. She’s far from the only sliver in the set, but she’s definitely the most noteworthy.

Stronghold is another old and uncommon set. For that reason, we've provided a link to a booster pack rather than a booster box.

 

As the very first set to ever feature the sliver creature type, you’ll discover plenty of these alien-looking cards in Tempest. This is the one that started it all when it comes to slivers, so it’s worth getting if you’re interested from a collecting standpoint in these creatures.

Unlike some of the others on this list, Time Spiral’s main theme is about echoing the past. True to its theme, a bunch of mechanics and creatures see a return in this set, including madness and slivers.

Wrap Up

Now that you know which sets have slivers in them, you might be wondering if this tribe is all it’s cracked up to be.

As with all other things in MTG, it mostly depends on you and your preferred play style. If you’re into creatures and using them to attack, then slivers are absolutely worth your consideration.

The more of them you have out, the more interesting abilities each individual sliver will have. Perhaps the biggest issue with sliver decks, though, is that they paint a huge target on you if you’ve built them well.

Be prepared to have to defend yourself when you’re playing a sliver deck. If you don’t mind a little competition, this won’t be an issue.